PROPOSITION 12 FAQ

What is Proposition 12?

Approved by voters in November 2007, Proposition 12 authorizes the issuance of up to $5 billion in general obligation funds for transportation projects. In 2009, the Texas State Legislature authorized TxDOT to go to contract on approximately $2 billion of those voter-approved bonds for non-tolled highway projects. Then in 2011, the Texas State Legislature authorized TxDOT to go to contract on the remaining $3 billion of those bonds. TxDOT’s Houston District and the Houston-Galveston Area Council (H-GAC) identified the US 290 Program as a candidate for Proposition 12 funding, and the program has received funding from both of those authorizations as a result.

 

Why was the US 290 Program selected to receive Proposition 12 Funding?

Currently ranked 20th on the Top 100 Most Congested Roadway Segments in Texas, the US 290/IH 610 interchange is the congestion point for three major thoroughfares in the Houston District, IH 10, US 290, and IH 610. Annual delay costs at the interchange are currently estimated at $46.88 million per year, and are projected to increase to $135.8 million per year if no improvements are implemented. With improvements anticipated to provide a 75% improvement to IH 10, and a 50% improvement to IH 610, the IH 610/US 290 interchange project will result in approximately $30 million in annual peak travel time savings to the three facilities.

 

What is being constructed with Proposition 12 funding now, and what will be constructed with that funding in the future?

In November 2009, the US 290 program received $314.6 million to acquire Right of Way, perform final design engineering, and build Project K. The low bid was received in May 2011, and construction began in June 2011. Currently construction is occurring on the inbound US 290 frontage road between W. 34th and W. 18th streets, and on the IH 610 North Loop mainlanes and frontage roads between the IH 610/US 290 interchange and Ella Boulevard.
Learn more about Project K construction details.

In September 2011, the US 290 Program received $72.1 million to build Project J-1, also at the IH 610/US 290 interchange. This funding became available due to cost underruns on Project K, and will be combined with $90 million in Proposition 14 bond funding to build the direct connector from IH 10 to outbound US 290 and eastbound IH 610, as well as the outbound US 290 frontage road from the IH 610/US 290 interchange to W. 34th Street.

In October 2011, the US 290 Program received $144 million to construct Project G at the US 290/Beltway 8 interchange.

Project G includes:

  • Construction of a continuous frontage road along Beltway 8 at US 290
  • Construction of collector-distributor lanes on US 290 from West Little York to FM 529
  • Construction of the US 290 mainlanes and frontage roads from West Little York to FM 529
  • Project G is tentatively scheduled to go to contract for construction in July 2012.
Also in October 2011, the program received $6.5 million to build Transportation System Management (TSM) projects along US 290 between Eldridge and Cypress Rosehill-Fry.
Learn more about what these projects will build

 

 

What is the total amount of Proposition 12 funding the US 290 Program has received?

As of late 2011, the program has received approximately $497.6 million in Proposition 12 funding, distributed in four allocations. Learn more about what construction those allocations are funding now and what construction they will fund in the future.

 

What has Proposition 12 funding meant for your Program’s timeline?

A condition of receiving Proposition 12 funds for our first project, Project K, was that any program project awarded the funds had to be let for construction no later than May 2011. Many stakeholders know that we had anticipated beginning construction on the IH 610/US 290 interchange in 2012. The receipt of these funds meant that Project K, which builds roughly half of the IH 610/US 290 interchange could begin sooner. The US 290 Program Team met the deadline by accelerating design work and as a result, Project K was let for construction in May 2011 and actual work began in June 2011.
Learn more about Project K

TxDOT had originally estimated Project G, our improvements at the US 290/Beltway 8 interchange, would go to contract for construction in 2014. But the Proposition 12 funding the program received in October 2011 moved that estimated date up to July 2012.
Learn more about Project G

For the Transportation System Management (TSM) intersection improvements which received Proposition 12 funding in October 2011, the result is earlier relief of the intersection congestion in the Cypress area well ahead of the larger proposed US 290 mainlane improvements.
Learn more about those TSM improvements

 

What is the 100 Most Congested Roadway Segments in Texas list and is US 290 included on it?

On September 1, 2011, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), in compliance with Rider 56 of the Senate Finance appropriations bill, updated its list of the 100 Most Congested Roadway Segments in Texas. Compiled using data obtained from the Texas Transportation Institute, the list ranks the most heavily used freeways, tollways, expressways, frontage roads, and major and minor arterial streets according to congestion thresholds, travel speeds, Texas Congestion Index, travel delay, and congestion cost.

Of the roadway segments listed, 31 are located in Harris County.

Several roadway sections located within in the limits of the US 290/Hempstead Corridor Program were identified in the list. US 290 between IH 610 and FM 529 was ranked 20th, US 290 between FM 529 and FM 1960 was ranked 32nd, and IH 610 between IH 10 and IH 45 was ranked ninth on the list.

Please visit the 100 Most Congested Roadway Segments in Texas for additional information.

 

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